Loading...

Should i order an asian studies presentation formatting single spaced academic


Where to buy a college presentation asian studies privacy formatting academic 149 pages / 40975 words chicago/turabian

International Relations of the Asia-Pacific ( IRAP) is a major international journal publishing the best original research in the field.Papers are welcomed from all IR scholars, both within and without the Asia-Pacific region.

All papers will be subject to anonymous peer review, and will be evaluated on the basis of their creativity, quality of scholarship, and contribution to advancing the understanding of the international relations of the region How to purchase a college presentation asian studies plagiarism-free A4 (British/European) Master's 6 hours double spaced.All papers will be subject to anonymous peer review, and will be evaluated on the basis of their creativity, quality of scholarship, and contribution to advancing the understanding of the international relations of the region.

Papers should be submitted online via the online submission web site.Detailed instruction for online submission could be found here.Submissions will be dealt with swiftly, and the editors aim to communicate a first decision to contributors within 8 weeks of submission.Detailed notes follow: The maximum length of articles including tables, figures, references, notes and abstract is 10,000 words, and the minimum length is 6,000 words.

Research Note should not exceed 10,000 words, including tables, figures, references, notes and abstract.Review essays should be between 3000-4000 words.Book reviews should be between 600-1000 words.Subheadings should be used to clarify and divide the structure of the discussions; if more than one level of subheadings is used, they must be clearly differentiated.

Articles and Research Note must be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 150 words.Submission should be made through the online submission system.Please see here for further information on online submission.If you have any problems with online submission, please contact the Editorial office.Manuscripts should be prepared using Microsoft Word.

Authors will also need to supply a title page separate to the main text of their manuscript.The title page should include the article title, authors’ names and affiliations and corresponding author’s e-mail address.Papers will be copy-edited and typeset upon acceptance, and journal style applied at that time (text and general content follows US spelling and punctuation; reference style follows a standard APA format).Authors should pay particular attention to the accuracy and correct presentation of references (see below).In-text references should be cited by giving the author's name, year of publication (Smith, 1999) and specific page numbers after a direct quotation.

In-text lists of references should be in chronological order.A reference list should appear at the end and should include only those references cited in the text.References should be double-spaced, arranged alphabetically by author, and chronologically for each author.Publications for the same author appearing in a single year should use e.Where there are more than two authors, the reference within the text should be cited as Smith et al.and the date, but include all the authors in the reference list.

University of washington press resources guide for authors

Examples: BOOK BOOK CHAPTER Boli-Bennett, J.(1979) ‘The ideology of expanding state authority in national constitution 1870-1970’, in J.

), National Development and the World System, Chicago: University of Chicago Pres, pp Princeton's Ph.D. program in East Asian Studies (EAS) has long been   East Asia, and in the transnational social and cultural study of contemporary East Asia..), National Development and the World System, Chicago: University of Chicago Pres, pp.

ARTICLE International Studies Quarterly, 36, 245-270.Footnotes should be avoided, or at least kept to a minimum International Relations of the Asia-Pacific (IRAP) is a major international journal   Authors should pay particular attention to the accuracy and correct presentation of   References should be double-spaced, arranged alphabetically by author, and   in foreign policy analysis', International Studies Quarterly, 36, 245-270..

Footnotes should be avoided, or at least kept to a minimum.

They should be indicated in the text by superscript figures and collected at the end of the article in numerical order Diagrams and tables should be provided on separate file appended to the article.They should be numbered, they should be referred to in the text, and their position in the text should be clearly marked best website to order college government presentation Chicago Business College Junior.They should be numbered, they should be referred to in the text, and their position in the text should be clearly marked.They should be comprehensible without reading the text.Artwork should be of sufficient quality to be reproduced without amendment.On acceptance of the final version for publication in the journal, a figure captions and tables should be inserted at the end of the file.

Tables, diagrams, figures, graphs or illustrations generated electronically should be saved as separate files and not embedded into the text file.The article should be typed unjustified, without hyphenation except for compound words.The TAB key should be used once for paragraph indents.Where possible, Times should be used for the text font and Symbol for any Greek and special characters.The word processing formatting features should be used to indicate bold, italic, Greek, maths, superscript and subscript characters.

Carriage returns should not be used to obtain spacing between lines, paragraphs, references, etc.Single spaces should be used after each sentence within a paragraph.The running titles and footnote features of the word processing package should not be used.IRAP conducts double-blinded peer review.When uploading your manuscript it should include no identifying author information.

All manuscripts must be original and not under consideration with another publication or in another form, such as a chapter of a book.Authors of submitted papers are obligated not to submit their paper for publication elsewhere until an editorial decision is rendered on their submission.Further, authors of accepted papers are prohibited from publishing the results in other publications that appear before the paper is published in the Journal unless they receive approval for doing so from the managing editor.IRAP takes publication ethics very seriously.If misconduct is found or suspected after the manuscript is published, the journal will investigate the matter and this may result in the article subsequently being retracted.

For queries, please contact the Editorial Office FORMS It is a legal requirement that the publisher holds a completed Licence to Publish form signed by the author before a paper can be published.Upon receipt of accepted manuscripts at Oxford Journals authors will be invited to complete an online copyright licence to publish form.

Best website to get college writing services asian studies presentation 110 pages / 30250 words asa two hours british

Please note that by submitting an article for publication you confirm that you are the corresponding/submitting author and that Oxford University Press ("OUP") may retain your email address for the purpose of communicating with you about the article.You agree to notify OUP immediately if your details change.

If your article is accepted for publication OUP will contact you using the email address you have used in the registration process Formatting Guidelines Columbia Graduate School of Arts and nbsp.

If your article is accepted for publication OUP will contact you using the email address you have used in the registration process.

Please note that OUP does not retain copies of rejected articles.Authors may purchase offprints of their article or copies of the issue in which it appears at a discounted price by returning an offprint order form to the publisher before the article is published in print The editors also encourage submission of alternative presentation formats.   Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University,   Format Text in manuscripts should be set out in double-spaced, indented (0.5 in. or   Section Headings Use bold type for first-order section titles (i.e. Heading 1)..Authors may purchase offprints of their article or copies of the issue in which it appears at a discounted price by returning an offprint order form to the publisher before the article is published in print.OPEN ACCESS OPTIONS FOR AUTHORS Authors have the option to publish their paper under the Oxford Open initiative; whereby, for a charge, their paper will be made freely available online immediately upon publication.After your manuscript is accepted the corresponding author will be required to accept a mandatory licence to publish agreement.As part of the licensing process you will be asked to indicate whether or not you wish to pay for open access.

If you do not select the open access option, your paper will be published with standard subscription-based access and you will not be charged.Oxford Open articles are published under Creative Commons licences.Authors publishing in IRAP can use the following Creative Commons licences for their articles: Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC BY) Creative Commons Non-Commercial licence (CC BY-NC) Please click here for more information about the Creative Commons licences.You can pay Open Access charges using our Author Services site.This will enable you to pay online with a credit/debit card, or request an invoice by email or post.

The open access charges applicable are: Regular charge - £1850/ $3000 / €2450 Reduced rate developing country charge* - £925 / $1500 / €1225 Free developing country charge* - £0 /$0 / €0 *Visit our Developing Countries page for a list of qualifying countries Please note that these charges are in addition to any colour/page charges that may apply.Orders from the UK will be subject to the current UK VAT charge.For orders from the rest of the European Union, OUP will assume that the service is provided for business purposes.Please provide a VAT number for yourself or your institution, and ensure you account for your own local VAT correctly.THIRD-PARTY CONTENT IN OPEN ACCESS PAPERS If you will be publishing your paper under an Open Access licence but it contains material for which you do not have Open Access re-use permissions, please state this clearly by supplying the following credit line alongside the material: Title of content Author, Original publication, year of original publication, by permission of rights holder This image/content is not covered by the terms of the Creative Commons licence of this publication.

For permission to reuse, please contact the rights holder.PRE-SUBMISSION LANGUAGE EDITING If your first language is not English, to ensure that the academic content of your paper is fully understood by journal editors and reviewers is optional.Language editing does not guarantee that your manuscript will be accepted for publication.For further information on this service, please click here.Several specialist language editing companies offer similar services and you can also use any of these.

Authors are liable for all costs associated with such services.CROSSREF FUNDING In order to meet your funding requirements authors are required to name their funding sources, or state if there are none, during the submission process.For further information on this process or to find out more about the CHORUS initiative please click here.Watsky, Art and Archaeology Yu Xie, Sociology Permanent Courses Courses listed below are graduate-level courses that have been approved by the program’s faculty as well as the Curriculum Subcommittee of the Faculty Committee on the Graduate School as permanent course offerings.

Paper submission guidelines association for asian american studies

Permanent courses may be offered by the department or program on an ongoing basis, depending on curricular needs, scheduling requirements, and student interest.Not listed below are undergraduate courses and one-time-only graduate courses, which may be found for a specific term through the Registrar’s website.Also not listed are graduate-level independent reading and research courses, which may be approved by the Graduate School for individual students the writing process and unify the format of written presentations.   The starting point for preparing an academic paper should be what you want to say in it.   The research process normally proceeds in the order that has been described above.   extend over two lines should be single-spaced (see chapter 3, guideline 3)..Also not listed are graduate-level independent reading and research courses, which may be approved by the Graduate School for individual students.

ART 569 State of the Field: Historiography of Chinese Painting (also EAS 569) The course focuses on the intellectual stock of the field of Chinese painting.It offers an opportunity to rethink the topics and issues that important studies in the field have addressed.

The goal of the seminar is to guide the Ph PHD Candidacy UBC Asian Studies The University of British nbsp.The goal of the seminar is to guide the Ph.students on how to tackle these topics and issues raised by previous scholarship.COM 581 Topics in Non-Western and General Literature (also EAS 589) By examining one or more literatures of the Near East or East Asia, and by referring to Western examples as well, the course raises literary issues that cannot be aired through the study of Western literature alone.Emphasis in any given year falls on Arabic, Persian, Chinese, or Japanese literature viewed in a comparative context.

EAS 502 Pro-Sem in Chinese & Japanese Studies General seminar dealing with the problems, methods, and possibilities of research peculiar to the fields of East Asian studies.Students may pursue their particular interests in their individual assignments, while participating in the general work of the seminar.EAS 503 Early China Selected topics in Chinese political, institutional, and cultural history in the pre-Qin period and Qin and Han dynasties.Focus on sources, traditional historical scholarship, and modern interpretations.EAS 504 Early China Selected topics in Chinese political, institutional, and cultural history in the pre-Qin period and Qin and Han dynasties.

Focus on sources, traditional historical scholarship, and modern interpretations.EAS 507 Chinese Intellectual History Methods, sources, and problems of research in Chinese thought, including examination of some broad interpretations of intellectual development in China.A reading knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is required for the study of selected problem areas through seminar discussion, oral reports, and research papers.EAS 508 Chinese Intellectual History Methods, sources, and problems of research in Chinese thought, including examination of some broad interpretations of intellectual development in China.A reading knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is required for the study of selected problem areas through seminar discussion, oral reports, and research papers.

EAS 513 Special Topics in Chinese History Selected problems on the historiography of the early, medieval, or late empires with a focus on literati thought, religion, or literature in historical context.Working knowledge of classical Chinese strongly recommended.EAS 514 Special Topics in Chinese History (also ART 570) Selected problems on the historiography of the early, medieval, or late empires with a focus on literati thought, religion, or literature in historical context.Working knowledge of classical Chinese strongly recommended.

EAS 517 Qing History: Working with Archival Documents (also HIS 531) This research seminar introduces graduate students to the history and bibliography of archival documents produced during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911), with chronological extensions also into the pre-Conquest period and transition to the early Republican era.

Emphasis is on government papers, and students gain essential knowledge of the Qing state from a survey of what primary sources have survived from this period.The second half of this course focuses on the craft of close reading, annotation and translation of original documents, and offers in-class instructions on research, writing and presentation skills.EAS 518 Qing History (also HIS 532) Topics in Chinese social and cultural history, 1600-1900, ranging from material culture, popular religion, and education to the history of science.

How to purchase a college asian studies presentation 100% plagiarism free us letter size single spaced turabian american

EAS 524 Early Japanese History Selected major periods or topics in the institutional, intellectual, and cultural history of Japan prior to 1600.EAS 526 Research Seminar in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History (also HIS 525) This course is a research and writing seminar that introduces major historical methods of research in ancient and medieval Japan.

In addition to weekly research assignments, students identify a research topic by the third week of the class, and complete a research paper at the end of the semester (entailing 15-20 pages) Your main point of contact in the Centre of South Asian Studies will be the Centre's   about your work, in addition to assistance available to you from the academic   order', in Routledge handbook of the South Asian diaspora, Chatterji, Joya and   (which should be at the foot of the page) which should be single-spaced..In addition to weekly research assignments, students identify a research topic by the third week of the class, and complete a research paper at the end of the semester (entailing 15-20 pages).

Instruction focuses on research methods and topics, although some reading of sources also occurs.EAS 531 Chinese Literature Critical and historical studies of classical poetry and poetics, with particular stress on the application of linguistic theory and other tools of literary analysis to Chinese poetry.EAS 532 Chinese Fiction and Drama A study of the development of Chinese narrative and dramatic literature, with emphasis on generic and thematic analysis If there are any issues, the file will be returned to the student for revisions. Uploading the   This allows for any formatting issues to be identified and corrected. We do not   Footnotes, endnotes, and bibliographic entries should be single spaced with double spacing between each entry. Required Order and Page Numbering..EAS 532 Chinese Fiction and Drama A study of the development of Chinese narrative and dramatic literature, with emphasis on generic and thematic analysis.EAS 533 Readings in Chinese Literature To suit the particular interests of students and instructor, a subject for intensive study is selected from classical or vernacular literature based on genres, periods, or individual writers, such as the prose of the Six Dynasties, the poetry of Tu Fu, the plays of Kuan Han-ch'ing, or Dream of the Red Chamber.

EAS 534 Readings in Chinese Literature To suit the particular interests of students and instructor, a subject for intensive study is selected from classical or vernacular literature based on genres, periods, or individual writers, such as the prose of the Six Dynasties, the poetry of Tu Fu, the plays of Kuan Han-ch'ing, or Dream of the Red Chamber.EAS 540 Primary Sources in Japanese Literature This course introduces students to the location, handling, and interpretation of primary sources in the study of premodern Japanese literature and intellectual history.This semester the course focuses on the genre of the love letter, with peripheral attention to broader categories of erotic verse and epistolary writing.Using documents from the fourteenth through nineteenth centuries, students develop proficiency in reading handwritten and woodblock-printed texts using hentaigana and other cursive forms.Students must have prior training in classical Japanese.

EAS 541 Classical Japanese Prose Aspects of the development of the narrative tradition in Japan, with an emphasis on analytical discussion of selected texts.EAS 542 Modern Japanese Prose A study of selected major authors and literary trends in modern Japan, with an emphasis on the Meiji and Taisho ? periods.Possible topics include the development of the modern novel, "inter-war" literature, and Taisho modernism EAS 543 Classical Japanese Poetics Man'yo shu the Imperial Anthologies, and the works of Basho.EAS 544 20th-Century Japanese Literature This course examines Japanese literary modernism through twentieth-century narrative and criticism.Analysis of texts are augmented through discussion of contemporary literary, theoretical, and historical developments.

EAS 545 Readings in Kanbun This course focuses on various types of Japanese kanbun, including waka kanbun (Japanized kanbun) from Nara to Meiji era, such as Mayo-gana, okoto-ten, soro-bun, etc.Basic knowledge of classical Japanese grammar and kanbun kundoku reading system is required.EAS 546 Introduction to Kanbun Introduction to the basic of reading Chinese-style Classical Japanese and its related forms.Texts: Literary and historical texts from both China and Japan.EAS 549 Japan Anthropology in Historical Perspective (also ANT 549) The course concerns Japan studies in the context of theories of capitalism, personhood, democracy, gender, and modernity.

The thematic focus this term is on health and medicine as they intertwine with social and cultural processes.Topics include: cultural variability of diagnosis and bio-medical practices; how biotechnologies shape and are shaped by social relationships; the containment of medicalization by received notions of kinship, gender, and national identity; conceptions of life itself; and models of public health and the containment of harmful behavior.Reading selections include material on Japan, China, and India.EAS 550 Topics in Social Theory and East Asia (also ANT 550) An introduction to classical social theory and an exploration of new directions in historical and social science literatures on East Asia.Weber's copnstruction of capitalism, Durkheim's notion of society, and Marx's concept of ideology all continue to inform contemporary East Asian studies; in turn, East Asian Studies has also been central to demonstrationg the Eurocentrism of many of these theories.

Guide to writing academic papers

EAS 563 Readings in Japanese Academic Style The two-semester course is designed for students in Chinese studies, who already possess reading fluency in Chinese.Its goal is to train these students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing; at the end of the year, students will be able to independently read modern Japanese scholarship on China.Students take this course after at least one year of modern Japanese (JPN 101/102) mphil in modern south asian studies course handbook 2017 18.Students take this course after at least one year of modern Japanese (JPN 101/102).

The course does not train all four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening; instead it is devoted entirely to rapidly develop the necessary reading skills in Japanese academic style.EAS 564 Readings in Japanese Academic Style II The second half of the two-semester course, which trains students in reading the particular style of Japanese academic writing.The second semester particularly focuses on academic writings from Meiji to the 1950s, including brief introduction of necessary Classical Japanese Grammar for this purpose.EAS 568 Readings in Ancient and Medieval Japanese History (also HIS 568) This course is designed to introduce fundamental themes and debates about ancient and medieval Japanese history, and how conceptualizations of Japan have changed from the third century CE through 1600.Approximately two books, or a comparable number of articles, are required each week, and wherever possible, a brief passage of Japanese scholarship will be presented as well.

Reading knowledge of modern Japanese is desirable.EAS 572 Readings in Modern Korean History (also HIS 528) A survey of major issues and debates in the historiography of modern Korea.Course introduces the major English language works on modern Korean history.Topics include: "opening" of Korea, Japanese colonialism, space of liberation, the Korean war, issues of gender and labor, and U.No previous knowledge of Korean history or language is necessary, but basic knowledge of twentieth century East Asian history is expected.EAS 581 Japanese Film and Media Studies This course examines the vivid perspectives of Japanese documentary media from the 1945 to present as the focal point of our consideration of the geopolitics of image media.The course explores major documentary works that critically engage issues of cultural identity, environmental devastation, regional community, and historical memory to raise questions about the changing prospects and politics of image media.

Our shifting focal points capture key transformations in the archipelago's urban and media environments from the dynamic views of Japan's most influential writers, critics, and media practitioners.

EAS 582 Readings in Manchu Language and History An introduction to Manchu language, texts, and history.EAS 584 Modernity and China (I): Power and Life (also ANT 584) This course addresses the topic of Chinese Modernity.Over time this course introduces different approaches and issues, while focusing on one set of issues each time.In this semester, it examines how life was dealt with differently by different modes of power and how a certain way of governing life became the threshold of modernity.Course examines the inspirations and limits of the framework of govern mentality and biopower, seen through the cases such as famine prevention, famine relief and the failure to do so, and through the interaction of different modes of power in Maoist socialism and post-Mao China.

EAS 594 Seeing the Interior: Cinema, Media, Inverse Visuality (also COM 594) From the invention of microscope, X-ray, representations of biological contagion and virus, to surveillance camera, the world is increasingly mediated and constituted by visual technologies and new forms of visualities that collapse the boundary between visibility and invisibility.This seminar explores visual representations of the interior and their mediating roles in larger historical and social processes of colonialism, modernization, urbanization, and global capitalism in the East Asian and global context.Readings intersect cinema and media studies, globalization, urban studies, theories of the body, and science and medical studies.HIS 526 Readings in Early Modern Japanese History (also EAS 521) Selected topics in the institutional and intellectual history of Tokugawa and Meiji Japan.Students attend the meetings of 321 and take part in a special graduate discussion group.

HIS 527 20th-Century Japanese History (also EAS 522) Selected topics in Japanese social and economic history since 1900.

Best website to purchase an asian studies presentation american us letter size undergrad. (yrs 3-4) 81 pages / 22275 words

HIS 529 Late Imperial/Early Modern China (also EAS 519) Selected problems and topics on 19th- and 20th- century China, that will also address historiographical issues in the West, the People's Republic, and Taiwan.HIS 530 Modern China (also EAS 520) This seminar will examine the major historiographical and methodological issues in Chinese history for the period 1600-1900.We will read and evaluate the most important historians and consider the issues that seem especially provocative or interesting Students may choose a mixture of formats, if the supervisor agrees (i.e. one essay   This will be approximately 25 pages long, double-spaced, and will include a   The student does not give a presentation; instead the examiners start right in  .We will read and evaluate the most important historians and consider the issues that seem especially provocative or interesting.

HUM 596 Humanistic Perspectives on Literature (also EAS 537/ CLA 596/ HLS 596) Marking the 10th anniversary of Derrida's death, this course provides an opportunity to "unpack" Derrida's library, to remember several of his lessons - about philosophy, literature, history, politics, religion, economics, ideology, law, rights, nationalism, racism, colonialism, the media, university institutions, capitalism, rogue states, the war on terror, justice, responsibility, language, friendship, love, life, death, and mourning - all of which are more urgent and necessary than ever before.

HUM 597 Humanistic Perspectives on History and Society (also SLA 597/ EAS 597) In this seminar we locate Spinoza and the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670) in the exciting currents of seventeenth-century philosophy, theology, biblical scholarship and exegesis.Resituating Spinoza in Golden Age Holland we examine the resources and relevant controversies that shaped the Tractatus, with an eye to common concerns and traditions: the legacies of humanism and Reformation in the Netherlands, for instance, the larger worlds of his friends, as well as the vibrant Jewish community in Golden Age Amsterdam and the varieties of Christian lay piety that fall broadly under the banner of "the Radical Reformation." (a) completed all required course work, (b) passed the Comprehensive Examinations, and (c) had a prospectus approved by their supervisory committee.Comprehensive Exams At admission, the Graduate Advisor will assign the candidate to a supervisor.In the beginning of the student’s second year, the supervisor and the candidate, in consultation with the Graduate Advisor, will propose the fields in which the candidate will be examined in the comprehensive examination and the names of two other faculty members to be members of the candidate’s committee (Research Supervisory Committee form).

The candidate will be expected to be examined in at least three fields, which will normally be: a) Major or General Field, namely the branch of study in which the candidate’s research is expected to lie, e., Chinese poetry; b) Minor Field (I), namely a sub-category of (a), from which the thesis topic is expected to emerge, e., Shi poetry of the Song period; and c) Minor Field (II), which falls outside (a) but is relevant to the candidate’s research interests, e.

Comprehensive Examinations Committee is a three-member committee responsible for examining the candidate in the candidate’s selected fields.

The major field is normally examined by the student’s primary supervisor in the Department of Asian Studies.The other two committee members will be composed of faculty members drawn from the appropriate fields, and can include colleagues from other departments, if sufficient justification is provided to the Graduate Advisor.The composition of the examination committee will be determined through consultation among the student, the student’s primary supervisor, and the Graduate Advisor.candidates must sit three written examinations for the Comprehensives.Exam Topics:In consultation with the supervisory committee (and the Graduate Advisor, if desired), three fields—that is, three areas of reading—are decided upon that will form the basis of the Comprehensive Exams.The student then formulates a reading list for each of the exam fields.(See below for details on the parameters of the lists.) The intent of the reading list is to allow the student to situate him/herself as a scholar in a chosen field and to provide evidence of depth and breadth of knowledge in that field.

In consultation with the supervisor (and Graduate Advisor, if desired), the student chooses among the three exam formats listed below.(Format number 3, the course syllabus, may be used for only one of the three fields.) Students may choose a mixture of formats, if the supervisor agrees (i.After the student has finished reading the materials on the reading list for the exam field, s/he writes an original paper on a topic arising from the readings.The field supervisor should agree with the candidate in advance on a specific topic, which may be an up-to-date bibliographic survey of the key positions and issues in the designated field, or may be more focused on a specific thematic or methodological question in that field.

The paper should be of near-publishable quality.

Best website to purchase a custom asian studies presentation rewriting undergraduate 14 days double spaced

It is normally assumed that the resulting paper will play at least a minor role in the student’s future dissertation, but perhaps even a major role (e., a section or chapter), and/or the paper may form the core of a publishable journal article.Students have one month to complete the paper after finishing the readings for that exam field Conference Presentation Formats and Roles   Association-Asian-American-Studies-Conference   prior to the conference in order to be included in the printed conference program.   All submissions should be typed and double-spaced.   *If your film is a part of a scholarly paper presentation and you are showing a small  .Students have one month to complete the paper after finishing the readings for that exam field.

Each paper should be maximum 40 pages long, including notes and bibliography.

The ideal length is 25-35 double-spaced pages East Asian Studies Graduate School.The ideal length is 25-35 double-spaced pages.The student sits a take-home examination.If the student is using this option for more than one of the Comprehensive Exams, a week should be allowed between exams how to purchase college fine art case study A4 (British/European) British Business.If the student is using this option for more than one of the Comprehensive Exams, a week should be allowed between exams.After the student has finished the reading list for that field, the examiner will come up with five appropriate questions and mail them to the Graduate Secretary at least four days before the exam is to take place deportesandorra.com/case-study/how-to-purchase-college-fine-art-case-study-a4-british-european-british-business.

After the student has finished the reading list for that field, the examiner will come up with five appropriate questions and mail them to the Graduate Secretary at least four days before the exam is to take place.

On the designated day, the Graduate Secretary gives the questions to the student, and s/he answers three of the five questions and returns her answers to the Graduate Secretary and the Graduate Advisor within 24 hours.(Another option: the examiner presents three questions of which the student chooses one.) Recommended length of the paper is 20 pages.In this format the student creates a course syllabus directed to teaching at a senior undergraduate or graduate level.

This will be approximately 25 pages long, double-spaced, and will include a rationale for the course (2-3 pages, double-spaced); course learning objectives and goals; introduction to the course (purpose and intended audience); comments on pedagogical activities and approach; detailed description of assignments and evaluation; outline of all the classes with the themes and assigned readings (full bibliographic details).A short summary of each reading for each class is to be provided together with a rationale for its use.The syllabus should be completed within one month from the time the student finishes the readings for that exam field.Submit a research supervisory committee form (signed by the Grad Advisor) to the Program Administrator Have all reading lists approved by the committee members and the Graduate Advisor (email from each committee member approving his/her list needs to be forwarded to the Grad Advisor).All three lists must be submitted to the Graduate Advisor for approval BEFORE any reading of the lists is begun Submit a Permission to proceed to comprehensive exam form Submit a written format for each exam Complete each field in sequence: Start reading, in consultation with the committee member Complete the exam and receive the committee member’s approval (some revision may be asked for) Repeat for all three fields After the third field exam is completed, share the three completed exams with all committee members and schedule the oral comprehensive exam Hold the oral exam After a successful exam, fill, collect signatures and submit Recommendation for Advancement to Candidacy form to the Program Administrator Schedule a prospectus defence for a date within six weeks of the oral exam.

Note that the composition of the committee may change at this point, and additional members may be added At least a week before the prospectus defence, submit the prospectus to the supervisory committee members Defend the dissertation prospectus Reading lists Each reading list typically consists of between 30 and 50 items.There are two types of items: 1) Complete books 2) Shorter items: a journal article, or chapter from book; excerpts (no more than 2-3 chapters) from a single book Each list must contain no more than 1/3 of type 1 items (complete books).It is expected that in the student’s primary field (and possibly in relevant secondary fields) the reading list will include items in the original Asian language(s) appropriate to the student’s topic.Each field’s list should be developed in consultation with the comprehensive exam committee member for that field.Once the list is completed, the committee member should send an email message communicating approval of the list to the Graduate Advisor and the Graduate Secretary.

Field examiners should advise the Graduate Secretary when the student has completed the readings and is planning to begin writing the 24-hour exam, essay or syllabus.The comprehensive exams should be started and finished within 12 months.5 months on each exam field, doing the readings and then writing the essay, exam, or syllabus.5-3 months gives the committee members time to read the essays/exams/syllabi and the student time to prepare for the oral defense.Students must receivePermission to proceed to Comprehensive Exam Form form, signed by both the Graduate Advisor and Primary Supervisor, before starting comprehensive examination.

Calls for papers center for asian studies university of colorado nbsp

Preconditions for permission to proceed to comprehensive exams are the completion of: – Three preliminary reading lists/bibliographies approved by the Graduate Advisor and the candidate’s Comprehensive Examinations Supervisory Committee Membersa) – all coursework and language requirements Evaluation: As each comprehensive exam field is completed, the committee member in charge of that field—having read the student’s essay, exam, or syllabus—should send a message to the Graduate Advisor and Graduate Secretary indicating their approval of the essay/exam/syllabus.Approval indicates that the essay/exam/syllabus is ready for the oral defense with no further revisions.(More revisions may be required after the defense Main menu. Home · Research & Academics · News & Events · Funding & Opportunities · Outreach · Resources · People · Support CAS  .

(More revisions may be required after the defense.

) While no grade is assigned for the Comps*, the committee must deem the essay/exam/syllabus to be first class (80% or above).Criteria for success will be clear evidence of wide reading, sophisticated critical and interpretive skills, and the capacity to conceptualize issues The first book to bear the University of Washington Press imprint appeared in 1920.   Other especially distinguished lists are in anthropology, Asian studies, environmental   (1) the hard copy must be an exact printout of the disk; (2) double-space   Name files sequentially in the order that they will appear in the book: for  .Criteria for success will be clear evidence of wide reading, sophisticated critical and interpretive skills, and the capacity to conceptualize issues.Each of the papers and the course syllabus may be written only twice The first book to bear the University of Washington Press imprint appeared in 1920.   Other especially distinguished lists are in anthropology, Asian studies, environmental   (1) the hard copy must be an exact printout of the disk; (2) double-space   Name files sequentially in the order that they will appear in the book: for  .Each of the papers and the course syllabus may be written only twice.The second attempt is to be made within four to six weeks of the committee member’s response to the first attempt .The second attempt is to be made within four to six weeks of the committee member’s response to the first attempt.Any second attempt should respond to the comments and criticisms provided by the committee member on the first versions of the essay/exam/syllabus.

Failure to achieve first-class standing at this stage will result in the student being required to withdraw from the program.The Oral Exam Within four weeks of the last written examination, candidates will take an oral examination, to be based mainly on the candidate’s three written field examinations.All of the questions posed on the written exams are open to oral questioning.Other questions relevant to the field reading lists also may be expected.Step one: the examiners need to agree in the first instance if the candidate’s answers (papers) are of sufficient quality to pass and thus merit an oral exam.

This information must be conveyed to both the Graduate Advisor and the Graduate Secretary.Step two: assuming all three examiners are satisfied that the written portion has been passed, the oral examination is scheduled.The Graduate Advisor appoints a Chair for the oral exam.All members of the comprehensive exam committee must be present in person or via Skype.

The oral exam itself is a free-wheeling conversation with the candidate designed to probe (again) for breadth and depth of knowledge of the subject areas.

Examiners ask questions in turn, starting with the field most distant from the Major Field, and ending with the Major Field exam.After each examiner has had sufficient opportunity to ask questions about his/her field, all examiners are free to ask questions based on the other exam papers.The student does not give a presentation; instead the examiners start right in with questions.Each examiner poses questions or makes whatever comments they have on the written exam that s/he supervised, for about 15-20 minutes each.

Then there can be another round of that if the examiners want it.Often toward the end it gets into a general discussion about the exams and how they inter-relate, or about the student’s thesis topic.Then the student is asked to leave the room.The chair asks each of the examiners in turn to certify that student has passed the oral defense.If everybody agrees that student has passed, student is informed that s/he will be admitted in the PhD candidacy as soon as s/he presents and defends the dissertation prospectus (which is supposed to be done within 6 weeks).

Acme academic publishing platforms

The written and oral examinations in each field will receive one grade: pass/fail.At the end of the defense, the committee deliberates on whether the papers and the oral defense merit a pass.If any of the comprehensive exam fields is judged as less than first class (79% or below), the student will be asked to re-do the paper for that field .If any of the comprehensive exam fields is judged as less than first class (79% or below), the student will be asked to re-do the paper for that field.

If a student fails a minor field, the student fails the examination and must repeat both the written and oral examinations in the minor field.A student who fails the major field or both minor fields must repeat the written and oral examinations in all fields Help me write my custom presentation asian studies 100% plagiarism-free Premium 20 days Doctoral single spaced.

A student who fails the major field or both minor fields must repeat the written and oral examinations in all fields.

No substitution of fields at re-examination will be permitted Help me write my custom presentation asian studies 100% plagiarism-free Premium 20 days Doctoral single spaced.No substitution of fields at re-examination will be permitted.A student will be allowed to re-sit comprehensives only once, and will be required to withdraw from the Ph.programme upon a second failure in one or more fields.A students needs to provide all three examiners, the Graduate Advisor and the Graduate Secretary with copies of all three exams papers.

The Graduate Secretary asks the Oral Exam Chair if s/he wants copies of the exams (papers).Dissertation Prospectus (Department-internal procedure) This will build on the groundwork laid by the Comprehensive Exams.It develops an argument proposing the direction in which the student expects the research to develop.The Dissertation Prospectus, prepared in consultation with the supervisory committee, must be defended within 6 weeks of the comprehensive exam oral defense.

The Prospectus should be written in such a way that it makes good sense to academics outside the area of specialization.It should, accordingly, include relevant explanation and detail at every stage; it is closer to a grant application or book proposal than a research essay.The Prospectus should be approximately 10 to 15 pages (not including bibliography), double-spaced.Ideally, the defense of this document should take place in a face-to-face discussion with the Supervisory Committee.There is normally no Chair for the Prospectus defense.

The Prospectus defense allows the supervisory committee to communicate with each other and with the student about specific expectations regarding the timing and strategy of dissertation research and writing, and any emendations to the research plan or bibliography.Approval of the Prospectus will be determined according to such criteria as the originality and value of the project, quality of research, and care of preparation.Should the supervisory committee decide at this stage that the program of research has not yet been adequately described and rationalized, it will invite the student, in consultation with the supervisory committee, to revise the relevant portions of the Prospectus for a second delivery within six weeks.If, on this second occasion, the committee remains dissatisfied, the student will be required to withdraw from the program.Candidacy is achieved only after the Prospectus has been approved and the appropriate paperwork (Approval of Dissertation Prospectus Form) has been given to the Graduate Secretary.